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Which travellers have to quarantine in Italy and for how long?

Published: 31/03/2021 By The Abode Team

As Italy makes quarantine mandatory for almost everyone arriving from overseas, here's a breakdown of how many coronavirus tests you'll need to get and how long you're facing in self-isolation.

Whether you’re visiting Italy or returning home there from a trip overseas, you’ll most likely have to get tested for coronavirus, quarantine, or both. Here’s what you need to know about the different rules for different countries, the kind of tests you’ll need, how to quarantine, and who’s exempt.

San Marino and Vatican City
  • Tests required: None
  • Days in quarantine: None
Congratulations: if you’re entering Italy from one of these two tiny states within its borders, you’re some of the only travellers in the world who neither have to get tested nor quarantine.

EU or Schengen Zone
  • Tests required: 2
  • Days in quarantine: 5
As of March 31st, people arriving from any other member of the European Union or Schengen Zone have to test negative for coronavirus no more than 48 hours before arriving in Italy, then spend five days in quarantine regardless. You must then take another test after self-isolating.

The requirement applies to everyone who is departing from or has passed through one of the following countries in the past 14 days: Andorra, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.

Travellers from Austria are subject to separate rules (see below).

Austria
  • Tests required: 3
  • Days in quarantine: 14
If you’ve spent more than 12 hours in Austria in the 14 days before coming to Italy, you’ll have to test negative no more than 48 hours before travelling and again no more than 48 hours after you arrive. Even with two negative tests, you must spend 14 days in quarantine, then get tested a third time after self-isolating.

United Kingdom
  • Tests required: 2
  • Days in quarantine: 14
If you meet the entry requirements allowing you to return to Italy from Great Britain or Northern Ireland, you need to test negative no more than 72 hours before travelling and again no more than 48 hours after you arrive. Even with two negative tests, you must spend 14 days in isolation. You do not have to get tested again after completing your quarantine.

Brazil
  • Tests required: 3
  • Days in quarantine: 14
Travellers who are eligible to return to Italy from Brazil have to test negative no more than 72 hours before travelling and again no more than 48 hours after they arrive. Even with two negative tests, you must spend 14 days in quarantine, then get tested a third time after self-isolating.

Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand
  • Tests required: None
  • Days in quarantine: 14
If you’re travelling to Italy from one of these ‘low-risk’ countries, you’ll have to go into quarantine for two weeks on arrival. You are not required to get tested at any point.

Rest of world
  • Tests required: None
  • Days in quarantine: 14
If you meet the requirements to enter Italy from any other country not already specified, you need to quarantine for two weeks on arrival. You are not required to get tested at any point.

Passengers on ‘Covid-tested’ flights from the United States
  • Tests required: 2
  • Days in quarantine: None
People flying from New York (JFK airport) or Atlanta (ATL) to Rome (FCO) or Milan (MXP) on one of the special ‘Covid-tested’ services offered by Alitalia, Delta and American Airlines are required to test negative no more than 48 hours before boarding. They are then tested again when they land in Italy. Provided both tests are negative, they can skip quarantine. The usual entry requirements continue to apply, however, meaning that only returning residents or people with an essential reason are eligible to take these flights.

What kind of coronavirus tests does Italy accept?
Both molecular (PCR) and rapid antigen tests are valid for the purposes of entering Italy. Test results do not need to be in Italian.

How should I quarantine?
Travellers who are subject to quarantine should report the address where they plan to self-isolate to the local heath authorities on arrival, then make their way to it using only private transport, such as a taxi. They must then remain inside for the duration of the quarantine period, avoiding contact with anyone else who shares the accommodation.

If you’re arriving in Italy by public means, you should be given a form to fill in at the airport, station or ferry terminal where you land to notify the relevant authorities of your contact details. If not, or if you cross the border by car, you’ll need to contact your destination’s local health authority yourself.

Are there any exceptions?
Cross-border workers, transport crew, business travellers and people briefly transiting through Italy are usually exempt from quarantine and may be exempt from testing, depending on where they’re travelling from and how long they plan to stay. You may need to apply for special authorization from the Italian Health Ministry to demonstrate that you qualify. Check the requirements on the ministry’s website.